July 4 2003 HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY To this repor

first_imgJuly 4, 2003HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY: To this reporter it seems important to acknowledge the steady, every day persistence in good solid work as the true basis for any independence. Whether the insistence to be free of oppression, or simple daily toil, only consistency in the approach yields any result. Here at Arcosanti our foundry crew is a good example. The production of bells is a tough job, especially in the hot summer month. The foundry crew produces bells five days a week with 3 or 4 heats [bronze pours] every day, molding, pouring, cleaning, drilling and assembling. [Photo & text: sa] Crewmember Jim Huth impresses a design into the silt form. [Photo & text: sa] Design detail. [Photo & text: sa] The crew at work. [Photo & text: sa] Crewmember Melinda Barnadas. [Photo & text: sa] The crew takes turns to pour the bronze. This time Andrew Kle [middle] is guiding the crucible with Melinda tailing. [Photo & text: sa] Tom Sargent and James Moscovic are shoveling, a stand-by security incase any bronze tries to escape. [Photo & text: sa] >>left>> The bells get cleaned, brushed and extra flashing is ground away. >>right>> Crewmember Sarah Merando assembles some of the bells. [Photo & text: sa] With beautiful designs and a clean sound, Soleri bells are a trademark all over the world of a courageous endeavor. There is not much romance in a repetative job, but the steady labour of this foundry crew insures in large part the ‘Independence’ to continue a dream, the slow but steady building of Soleri’s ‘Urban Laboratory’ here at Arcosanti. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more

Pictured here is Paolo Soleri and his publicist a

first_imgPictured here is Paolo Soleri, and his publicist and editor, Lissa McCullough, Ph.D. Lissa acted as a facilitator for this wonderful dialogue on the implementation and implications of sustainable living.  [photo & text: Logan Bier] July 8, 2011A group of 25 individuals from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona visited Arcosanti as part of a four week program titled “Rethinking the Land Ethic”. The group, comprised of participants from across the country, spent an hour in the Soleri Archives to discuss sustainability and the concept of Arcology with Paolo Soleri. Represented were perspectives from ethicists, philosophers, art teachers, and other educators.  Read more about NEH, NAU and their programs on sustainability here: http://tinyurl.com/3btzsf9center_img The group was led by co-directors Joan McGregor, Professor of Philosophy at Arizona State University, and Dan Shilling, with the ASU Institute for Humanities Research.  [photo & text: Logan Bier]last_img read more

The US video and TV industry saw a 1 rise in cons

first_imgThe US video and TV industry saw a 1% rise in consumer spend in 2018, taking the market to US$133 billion, according to Futuresource Consulting.The research firm estimates that the US market accounted for 53% of the global industry total last year and predicted modest annual increases for the coming years, reaching US$136 billion by 2022.“There’s no doubt that 2018 was a significant year for the US video and TV industries,” said David Sidebottom, principal consultant at Futuresource Consulting.  “The entertainment landscape was redefined with companies changing their strategies and undergoing some major M&A activity.”“Disney’s proposed acquisition of Fox and confirmation of its direct-to-consumer service, Disney+, along with the completion of AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner, were key moments in a turbulent twelve months.”Futuresource claims that subscription video-on-demand spend by consumers exceeded that of transactional video for the first time in 2018, growing by about 30% for a sixth consecutive year.By comparison, pay TV revenues declined by an estimated 2% to US$97 billion in 2018. They will decline by an average of 1% per year for the forecast period, as consumers spend more on SVOD services, but will still account for more than two-thirds of total entertainment spend in 2022, according to Futuresource.“There’s no doubt that US pay TV operators are under pressure, with many services placing greater emphasis on broadband delivery, third party services and pay TV lite operations to help maintain overall revenues,” said Sidebottom.“At the same time, key players are protecting their high value customers, by continued investment in premium content and rolling out advanced Set-Top Boxes to provide the ultimate TV viewing experience.”last_img read more