Patagonia Launches Simple Fly Fishing Campaign with New Book and Fly Fishing Kit

first_imgPatagonia, Inc., the outdoor apparel company, has launched its Simple Fly Fishing campaign – a program designed to demystify fly fishing and make it more accessible by offering simple gear, easy techniques and basic teachings for all ages and skill levels.The centerpiece is Patagonia’s Simple Fly Fishing kit, which contains a tenkara-style fly fishing rod, box of flies, line and leader, quick set up guide and a new book by Yvon Chouinard, Craig Mathews and Mauro Mazzo entitled Simple Fly Fishing: Techniques for Tenkara and Rod & Reel.The kit is available in Patagonia retail stores across the United States, Canada, Japan and online starting today, and remaining stores on May 1. In addition, anyone visiting Patagonia stores can also get instant advice about the best places to go fishing in their local areas, as well as information about tenkara fly fishing clinics – open to the public – to be held in select retail locations in the coming days. This is the first time the company has sold gear for fly fishing, except for apparel.patagonia simple fly fishing kit“This is for the young person who has wanted to learn, but is intimidated by the complexity, elitism and expense of fly fishing,” said Chouinard, Patagonia’s founder and owner.Behind the campaign is a belief that the way toward mastery of any endeavor is to work toward simplicity — and to replace complex technology with knowledge.The tenkara fly rod contained in the kit – which has no reel – comes from a centuries-old Japanese fly fishing technique, which has been all but lost in modern-day fly fishing. The rod is light, sensitive and elegant.Chouinard has found this incredibly simple technique to be highly effective at catching even the most difficult, highly selective fish. Patagonia developed the kit to promote the simplicity of this technique and bring many new people to the sport of fly fishing.The book aims to teaches readers — from beginner anglers to master fishermen — how to discover where the fish are, at what depth and what they are feeding on. It then describes the techniques needed to present a fly at that depth, make it look lifelike and hook the fish. With chapters on wet flies, nymphs and dry flies, the authors employ both the tenkara rod as well as regular fly fishing gear to cover all the bases.One percent of the sales from the book go to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment. In addition, the authors are donating their entire proceeds from the sales of the first edition to the Native Fish Society, the Atlantic Salmon Federation, and 1% for The Planet.Finally, Temple Fork Outfitters, which produces the fly fishing rods for Patagonia, is donating $10 for each rod sold to organizations dedicated to river and creek restoration.Kit Details:·       Tenkara fly rod, available in 8’6″, 10’6″ or 11’6″ lengths·       Simple Fly Fishing (book) by Yvon Chouinard, Craig Mathews & Mauro Mazzo·       Simple Fly Fishing quick set up guide·       Box of Yvon-recommended flies (12 count)·       Line & leaderRetail price for the entire kit is $255-$280, depending on rod choice. Kit components are also for sale individually.Founded by Yvon Chouinard in 1973, Patagonia is an outdoor apparel company based in Ventura, California. A certified B-Corporation, Patagonia’s mission is to build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm and use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.patagonia fishing lifestyle old guyslast_img read more

Bridgedale’s Top Tips for Choosing the Right Sock

first_imgMost of us don’t really think much when it comes to choosing the right socks.  A good pair will make all the difference in the world.  Engineered for performance and durability, and with more than 100 years of knitting expertise, Bridgedale’s unique Fusion Technology blends synthetic and natural fibers to give you the best of both worlds, and ensure the highest level of performance and comfort.Pay attention to the material.  Woolen socks on their own can sometimes be too hot, and hold too much moisture, while synthetic socks can wick moisture, but has nowhere for it to go inside your boot or shoe. A combination fiber mix featuring Merino wool will provide good cushioning and also wicks moisture away from the skin to help prevent blisters. A recommendation would be that unless you cannot wear wool, try to avoid socks made from cotton as they will hold moisture next to skin with potential to cause blisters.Make sure your socks fit properly. Whether you’re hiking through the Pacific Crest Trail or hitting the slopes, good fitting socks are as important as properly fitted boots or shoes.  Bridgedale socks feature Lycra® through the entire sock as well as additional Lycra® at the mid-foot, above the ankle and in the cuff, to ensure snug but not too tight a fit. Any bagginess or extra material at the heel or toe means it’s too big. Poorly fitting socks can simply ruin your ability to go farther during your adventures. bridgedale-logo-2015-01Choose proper cushioned socks to give extra protection to those areas that take the most punishment, such as the ball of the foot, lace up area and Achilles. Seams should also be flat so they do not create more measure points on your foot. Bridgedale uses a unique anti-compression technology in its foot pads giving protection where you need it the most without adding unnecessary bulk.Choose the right weight. Lightweight socks are perfect for warmer weather, mid-weight socks are good all-rounder and ideal for a good intensive level of activity, and heavyweight socks are intended for long distances in colder environments.To learn more about the Bridgedale’s technology and collection, visit www.bridgedale.com/usa.image001last_img read more

Blue Ridge Parkway wildlife cam captures Bobcat with meal in mouth

first_imgAs the video suggests, bobcats are excellent hunters. The cat, named for its bobbed tail, lives only in North America and grows to about double the size of a housecat. Blue Ridge Parkway wildlife cam captures Bobcat with meal in mouth According to the Charlotte Observer, the park service uses the cameras to learn more about the wildlife that lives (and hunts!) along the Blue Ridge Parkway. The cameras have been funded by the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation since 2009, and have captured more than 25,000 images of over 35 species of wildlife including black bears, bobcats, coyotes, red and gray foxes, elk, European wild hogs, white-tail deer and many other species, the foundation says.  A hungry bobcat was caught on a National Park Service infrared nighttime wildlife cam running with a rabbit clamped between its jaws. The National Park Service posted the video to its Facebook page with the caption, “When you grab the last cupcake from the breakroom…” To place the cameras, volunteers hike off the beaten paths into remote areas off the parkway and use GPS coordinates to place the motion-sensitive cameras, according to the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation website. Volunteers then return periodically to find out what types of birds, mammals, reptiles and other creatures have been captured on camera. This kind of “citizen science” allows park biologists to cover more territory in a multiyear study of animal populations and their locations and habits. last_img read more

Accused Appalachian Trail killer will use insanity defense

first_imgThe night of the murder, Jordan confronted Sanchez and three other hikers along the trail. When the group set up camp that night, Jordan appeared again and threatened to burn them in their tents. The hikers tried to leave, and Jordan pulled a knife. Two hikers ran and Jordan chased them, but the hikers escaped. Jordan then approached Sanchez and a female hiking companion. As the female hiker watched, Jordan stabbed Sanchez to death. Jordan is accused of stabbing Sanchez to death in May 2019 after he encountered him along the trail in Wythe County, Va. Before the stabbing, Jordan had threatened and intimidated other hikers along the trail, authorities say.  Reports show that the female hiker ran and, as she began to tire, Jordan caught up with her and stabbed her, too. She played dead and Jordan left to “find his dog,” according to an affidavit. The injured female hiker than ran down the trail and encountered a male and female hiker who helped her walk 6 miles and call for help. Jordan has a history of mental illness but was deemed fit to stand trial back in June after months of treatment and evaluation at the federal Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Medical Center in Butner, N.C. At the time, a judge found no “reasonable” cause to believe Jordan was suffering a mental disease or defect. James A. Jordan, the hiker accused of killing fellow thru-hiker and Iraq War veteran Ron Sanchez, and seriously wounding an anonymous female hiker, says that he was insane at the time of the crimes, WBIR reports. Jordan’s lawyer filed the notice last week in Abingdon, Va. U.S District Court, where Jordan is being held while awaiting trial.last_img read more

Colombia Confiscates Almost Two Tons of Cocaine

first_imgBy Dialogo September 23, 2010 The Colombian Navy confiscated 1,887 kilograms of cocaine being transported on a speedboat near a Caribbean beach, while the police expropriated from three fugitive drug traffickers assets valued at more than 110 million dollars, the authorities announced on 21 September. Initially, a Navy patrol intercepted a speedboat carrying the cargo of cocaine in the Gulf of Urabá, near the border with Panama, and arrested the five crew members who tried to evade pursuit by the military authorities. Defense Minister Rodrigo Rivera said that the confiscated drugs had an estimated cost of 38 million dollars on the international market. “This seizure represents a serious blow to the finances of the Los Urabeños criminal gang, which has done so much damage in the country’s northwest,” the minister affirmed. The illegal armed group to which Rivera referred is a drug-trafficking organization made up of former extreme-right-wing paramilitaries who failed to fulfill the terms of a peace agreement with the government and returned to illicit activities. At the same time, the National Police and the Attorney-General’s Office expropriated 203 assets, including houses, apartments, farms, and vehicles, belonging to the fugitive drug traffickers Daniel Barrera, alias “El Loco Barrera,” and the brothers Javier Antonio and Luis Enrique Calle Serna, better known as the “Comba.” The properties have an estimated value of over 110 million dollars. Colombia is the world’s leading producer of cocaine with around four hundred metric tons a year, despite the efforts of Bogotá and the United States to reduce coca cultivation. The price in Colombia for one kilo of cocaine is around 1,000 dollars, while in international markets one kilo can bring in up to 30,000 dollars, according to security sources. In addition, Colombia’s geographic position, with two oceans on its shores, makes it a strategic location for trafficking drugs and arms. According to the government, the drug business is currently controlled by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) guerrilla group, groups of former paramilitaries, and cartels with ties to the Mexican cartels. In 2009, the Colombian authorities confiscated more than 203 tons of cocaine, and the figure so far this year exceeds 90 tons.last_img read more

Coast Guard Officers from the Americas Train in Cartagena

first_imgBy Dialogo April 19, 2011 The Fifth International Maritime Interdiction Course, offered by the Caribbean Coast Guard Command with the objective of implementing joint strategies and tools for combatting drug trafficking at sea, has opened in Cartagena with the participation of twenty naval officers from thirteen countries. On this occasion, students from the navies of the United States, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Mexico, Honduras, Panama, Guatemala, Ecuador, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, the Dominican Republic, and Colombia are participating. This fifth edition of the course offers another opportunity to share Colombia’s experience in the fight against drug trafficking and strengthen international cooperation. The modules to be covered include human rights, coast guard operational doctrine, security at sea, and legislation applicable to maritime interdiction operations. The National Navy will continue to hold training courses of this kind, which strengthen international cooperation and make it possible to improve the techniques used in operations against illicit activities at sea.last_img read more

Colombian and Honduran Air Forces Conduct Honcol-1 Interdiction Exercise

first_img The Colombian and Honduran Air Forces are successfully carrying out the Honcol-1 interdiction exercise, with the objective of combating situations and activities derived from illegal narcotics trafficking by air and sea. In 2010, the combined forces of the two countries succeeded in detecting, destroying, and immobilizing at least 15 aircraft, and 8 so far this year. For this reason, and with the aim of invigorating both their air and maritime interdiction systems, simulations of real air operations are being conducted during the current exercise. Colombia is participating with the Caribbean Air Group, deploying two OV-10 Bronco planes on the island of San Andrés, while the Honduran aircraft will be deployed from Soto Cano Base in Comayagua. The Honduran aircraft will simulate illegal flights, while the Colombians will try to locate, intercept, and force them to land, immobilizing them. This last action will include the participation of the Colombian police, through the Air Special Forces Group (ACOEA) and the judicial technical police. The exercise will also have the objective of increasing both forces’ capabilities to combat terrorism and illegal arms and ammunition trafficking in the Caribbean, taking advantage of the two countries’ infrastructure and experience for that purpose. Honcol-1 will be conducted in observance of existing air-safety regulations, in order to ensure not only the fulfillment of the planned objectives, but also normal commercial and civilian air traffic. The agreement governing the exercise was signed at the beginning of July by the Air Force commanders of Colombia, Gen. Julio González Ruiz, and Honduras, Col. Ruis Landa Dubón, during the Fifth Aeronautical Fair recently held in Colombia. By Dialogo August 02, 2011last_img read more

Chilean Armed Forces Celebrate Amidst Debate on Future Military Investment

first_img The Chilean Armed Forces celebrated on September 19 with a massive parade of over 9,000 personnel and warfare exhibition in Santiago, while Congress is debating the future of a law intended to guarantee weapons investment. The Military Parade was held in the enormous central O’Higgins Park, to commemorate the 202 years of existence of the Chilean Army with a parade featuring Army, Navy, and Air Force personnel, as well as Carabineros (Militarized Police.) Representatives of the Armed Forces from Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, and France also participated this year, as well as the Argentine-Chilean Joint Peacekeeping Force ‘‘Cruz del Sur’‘, created in 2011 to support UN peacekeeping missions in different countries. This year, the military parade, officially celebrated since 1915, did not include heavy artillery equipment, since it was centered on ‘‘the human factor’‘ with the deployment of over 9,000 personnel, assured Defense Minister Andrés Allamand. Chilean President Sebastián Piñera led the parade and was accompanied by the Military High Command, officials and foreign guests, such as the Chief of Staff of the French Army, General Bertrand Ract-Madoux, and the Chief of Staff of the Argentine Army, General Luis Alberto Pozzi. Thousands of people came to the event and enjoyed the uniformed parade, mainly the deployment of three F-16 fighter jet squads escorted by Puma and Cougar Assault helicopters, as well as other aircrafts from the Chilean Air Force. The Chilean Armed Forces are considered one of the better equipped in the region, after the Chilean government started an armament renovation in 1998, buying F-16 fighter jets, leopard tanks, helicopters, frigates, and Scorpene submarines, considered the most modern in Latin America. By Dialogo September 21, 2012last_img read more

Uruguayan Congress Increases Penalties for Cocaine Dealers

first_imgBy Dialogo November 08, 2012 The Uruguayan Congress, which is debating the legalization of marihuana, passed a bill on November 6, to increase prison sentences for the crimes of cocaine trafficking and its derivatives, as well as cases of police and military corruption. Congress passed the bill – previously approved by the Senate – with the support of all political parties (57 votes of 57 attendees); therefore, it will be advanced to the Executive branch for its final sanction. The new legislation dictates that those found guilty of cocaine trafficking-related crimes will be charged with a minimum of two to three years of imprisonment. Despite an increase in the sentence, the bill considers mitigation when the amount seized is not significant and depending on whether the drug dealer did not sell drugs to minors. In these cases, judges will be able to apply alternative sentences. If the offenders are police members, soldiers, legislators, or members of the Executive and Judiciary powers, the penalties will increase by one-third the sentence. The bill is part of a package of measures submitted by President José Mujica in June, and it also includes the project for the “controlled legalization” of marihuana, which will be decided by Congress before the end of the year and then be submitted to the Senate for consideration.last_img read more

Panamá de Arauca: an interagency consolidation project

first_imgThe new closeness with the community in addition to the Defense Ministry’s faithful commitment to safety, have achieved strategic results from the production and transport of crude oil. Incidents and attacks on convoys have been reduced by 65%, and the community began to report attacks. Such reports in the past were minimal to non-existent. The government and companies were acting independently to address their separate concerns over maintaining state institutions and concerns over the defense of corporate resources. This has cost both valuable time, which in turn has benefited the criminal groups. Thanks to the willingness of the community and the organizations involved, the consolidation project gradually began to bear fruit, and the objectives were fully realized within months. The government and companies were acting independently to address their separate concerns over maintaining state institutions and concerns over the defense of corporate resources. This has cost both valuable time, which in turn has benefited the criminal groups. Phase 1 began immediately thereafter. The community would be the main beneficiary of this phase’s main goals of school improvements, health brigades, and free school supplies, in addition to new studies on the feasibility of community-based foundations and enterprises. In 2012 and 2013, the Panamá de Arauca region faced kidnappings, extortion, and attacks on vehicles and employees in the public and private sectors. The criminal alliances worked to turn this area into a strategic corridor in their plan to weaken the Colombian government. Although only half of the project has been completed, the most important part has been getting started and engaging institutions, which is already a reality. As shown by the steady results from the initial phases, the success of the consolidation plan is guaranteed. Thanks to the willingness of the community and the organizations involved, the consolidation project gradually began to bear fruit, and the objectives were fully realized within months. The National Police have begun to take better control of registering people and vehicles. They have also initiated a communications strategy for the project. The four phases, still in development, aim to improve community life and mobility in the area, as well as increase the visibility of projects and activities in the region to promote the institutions involved in the consolidation plan. Similarly, and no less importantly, the goal is for the community ultimately to assume responsibility for peaceful communities as the engine of social and economic progress. Phase 0 and/or the preliminary phase – one of the most difficult – required pairing institutions to work together, and engaging them in the economy and in society. This phase started in 2013. They created an action plan to build a stronger police presence and enact a permanent budget for development in the area. This town has traditionally been a vital economic center for Orinoco regional development (as this area of the country is known) because its vast plains hide large oil fields that have contributed significantly to Colombia’s economy. As a region consisting primarily of plains, Panamá de Arauca boasts livestock and dairy activities. This provided the participants with an opportunity for community support by providing equipment and improving livestock facilities, an important source of income for thousands of people in Arauquita. The logo promoting the consolidation plan has butterfly wings in the colors of the institutions involved, and represents the butterfly effect that a small town in Colombia is beginning to have on the world. Phase 1 began immediately thereafter. The community would be the main beneficiary of this phase’s main goals of school improvements, health brigades, and free school supplies, in addition to new studies on the feasibility of community-based foundations and enterprises. Although only half of the project has been completed, the most important part has been getting started and engaging institutions, which is already a reality. As shown by the steady results from the initial phases, the success of the consolidation plan is guaranteed. The Plan consists of four phases to integrate entities of the Colombian state oil company Ecopetrol, the National Defense Ministry’s Advisory Campaign Group (GAC), the Armed Forces General Command, the National Army, the Office of the Prosecutor General, the Administrative Unit for Territorial Consolidation (UACT), the municipal government of Arauca, the municipal government of Arauquita, and private enterprises. The participants realized that an interagency commitment would be essential to resolve the crisis. Panamá de Arauca is a town in the municipality of Arauquita, in the department of Arauca in eastern Colombia, on the border with neighboring Venezuela. Currently, the two final phases to consolidate the state’s presence and operations in Panamá de Arauca are being implemented. The National Learning Service (SENA), the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare (ICBF) and the Colombian Institute of Sports (Coldeportes) have joined the institutions already involved. The four phases, still in development, aim to improve community life and mobility in the area, as well as increase the visibility of projects and activities in the region to promote the institutions involved in the consolidation plan. Similarly, and no less importantly, the goal is for the community ultimately to assume responsibility for peaceful communities as the engine of social and economic progress. Unfortunately, it is not only the government and major national and international companies that have established a presence in this strategically and economically important area of Colombia. In addition, the underground riches have attracted guerrillas and terrorist groups, who intend to stem the growth of the region, one way or another. The logo promoting the consolidation plan has butterfly wings in the colors of the institutions involved, and represents the butterfly effect that a small town in Colombia is beginning to have on the world. The National Police have begun to take better control of registering people and vehicles. They have also initiated a communications strategy for the project. One of the most urgent needs in the region is a dairy processing center. An analysis was conducted in this phase to determine what was required to make the center viable and affordable for the community. However, after looking at how the growing problem has not only caused economic losses but the deaths of dozens of farmers, employees, soldiers and police, government institutions decided to take action on the issue and draft the Strategic Recovery and Consolidation Plan for Panamá de Arauca. One of the most urgent needs in the region is a dairy processing center. An analysis was conducted in this phase to determine what was required to make the center viable and affordable for the community. Panamá de Arauca is a town in the municipality of Arauquita, in the department of Arauca in eastern Colombia, on the border with neighboring Venezuela. This town has traditionally been a vital economic center for Orinoco regional development (as this area of the country is known) because its vast plains hide large oil fields that have contributed significantly to Colombia’s economy. Unfortunately, it is not only the government and major national and international companies that have established a presence in this strategically and economically important area of Colombia. In addition, the underground riches have attracted guerrillas and terrorist groups, who intend to stem the growth of the region, one way or another. However, after looking at how the growing problem has not only caused economic losses but the deaths of dozens of farmers, employees, soldiers and police, government institutions decided to take action on the issue and draft the Strategic Recovery and Consolidation Plan for Panamá de Arauca. Once the goals of these last two phases have been fully met, the families of Panamá de Arauca should notice an evident increase in their resources, and incidents against the economy will surely be reduced nearly to zero. Interestingly, the riches of this area have led outlaw groups such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) to establish criminal alliances in order to intimidate civilians and companies interested in developing the region. This threatens to jeopardize the government’s institutions and absolute control over the area. The new closeness with the community in addition to the Defense Ministry’s faithful commitment to safety, have achieved strategic results from the production and transport of crude oil. Incidents and attacks on convoys have been reduced by 65%, and the community began to report attacks. Such reports in the past were minimal to non-existent. By Dialogo November 12, 2014 Phase 0 and/or the preliminary phase – one of the most difficult – required pairing institutions to work together, and engaging them in the economy and in society. This phase started in 2013. They created an action plan to build a stronger police presence and enact a permanent budget for development in the area. This was an important step because the community began to recognize the project and participants. They also began to feel the benefits from the program. For example, the Pedro Nel Jiménez school was remodeled to serve not only the students, but the community as well. The school will be used to hold meetings and healthcare-related activities. As a region consisting primarily of plains, Panamá de Arauca boasts livestock and dairy activities. This provided the participants with an opportunity for community support by providing equipment and improving livestock facilities, an important source of income for thousands of people in Arauquita. In 2012 and 2013, the Panamá de Arauca region faced kidnappings, extortion, and attacks on vehicles and employees in the public and private sectors. The criminal alliances worked to turn this area into a strategic corridor in their plan to weaken the Colombian government. This was an important step because the community began to recognize the project and participants. They also began to feel the benefits from the program. For example, the Pedro Nel Jiménez school was remodeled to serve not only the students, but the community as well. The school will be used to hold meetings and healthcare-related activities. In short, this consolidation plan is a great example of how a well-led project allows the government, law enforcement, private enterprise and the community to reclaim their legitimacy in a territory that should never have been at the mercy of criminals. Interestingly, the riches of this area have led outlaw groups such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN) to establish criminal alliances in order to intimidate civilians and companies interested in developing the region. This threatens to jeopardize the government’s institutions and absolute control over the area. In short, this consolidation plan is a great example of how a well-led project allows the government, law enforcement, private enterprise and the community to reclaim their legitimacy in a territory that should never have been at the mercy of criminals. Too bad the author of this article, General (retired) Gonzales Villamil does not remember the famous Eduardo of the ELN with whom he communicated and other things… Currently, the two final phases to consolidate the state’s presence and operations in Panamá de Arauca are being implemented. The National Learning Service (SENA), the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare (ICBF) and the Colombian Institute of Sports (Coldeportes) have joined the institutions already involved. Once the goals of these last two phases have been fully met, the families of Panamá de Arauca should notice an evident increase in their resources, and incidents against the economy will surely be reduced nearly to zero. The Plan consists of four phases to integrate entities of the Colombian state oil company Ecopetrol, the National Defense Ministry’s Advisory Campaign Group (GAC), the Armed Forces General Command, the National Army, the Office of the Prosecutor General, the Administrative Unit for Territorial Consolidation (UACT), the municipal government of Arauca, the municipal government of Arauquita, and private enterprises. The participants realized that an interagency commitment would be essential to resolve the crisis. last_img read more