After suffering an unprecedented heat wave, Region 9 is now water-logged – REO

first_imgRegional Executive Officer of Region Nine (Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo), Carl Parker on Sunday stated that while residents of the Rupununi have been freed of the El Niño-induced heat wave, the current rains are now causing the land to become water-logged.“We moved from one extreme to another…but what I can say is that we have no issue with lack of water now,” Parker stated.He noted that while the rainy season was a bit delayed, it has brought relief to farmers in the various Amerindian communities after months of severe drought.Region Nine was hit with the drought-like conditions and high temperatures of the El Niño in early 2015 and had continued to bear the consequences of the sweltering heat until two weeks ago. During the drought, the Rupununi was dried out completely, the green had disappeared from the savannahs, the crops were killed and the animals were dying.It had reached a point where authorities had to declare a state of emergency. The Region was never struck with a heat wave of this magnitude since 1988.Twenty-four wells were dug across the Region, but they were not enough to save the livestock.Parker stated that the water table of the Region is very high and this has helped to cause the land to become water logged. As a result, the Brazilian Army, which had helped in the relief efforts by drilling wells, pulled out. However, they have promised to return in August when the rains are predicted to end.Nevertheless, he noted that the farmers were happy and the farms were doing well. However, they were worried that the heavy rainfall would damage their crops. “If we have too much rain, the cassava would be soaked,” Parker explained.This newspaper understands that during the drought over million was poured into the Region.last_img

first_imgRegional Executive Officer of Region Nine (Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo), Carl Parker on Sunday stated that while residents of the Rupununi have been freed of the El Niño-induced heat wave, the current rains are now causing the land to become water-logged.“We moved from one extreme to another…but what I can say is that we have no issue with lack of water now,” Parker stated.He noted that while the rainy season was a bit delayed, it has brought relief to farmers in the various Amerindian communities after months of severe drought.Region Nine was hit with the drought-like conditions and high temperatures of the El Niño in early 2015 and had continued to bear the consequences of the sweltering heat until two weeks ago. During the drought, the Rupununi was dried out completely, the green had disappeared from the savannahs, the crops were killed and the animals were dying.It had reached a point where authorities had to declare a state of emergency. The Region was never struck with a heat wave of this magnitude since 1988.Twenty-four wells were dug across the Region, but they were not enough to save the livestock.Parker stated that the water table of the Region is very high and this has helped to cause the land to become water logged. As a result, the Brazilian Army, which had helped in the relief efforts by drilling wells, pulled out. However, they have promised to return in August when the rains are predicted to end.Nevertheless, he noted that the farmers were happy and the farms were doing well. However, they were worried that the heavy rainfall would damage their crops. “If we have too much rain, the cassava would be soaked,” Parker explained.This newspaper understands that during the drought over million was poured into the Region.last_img

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