Sun rises, flags fall on opening night of swimming finals

first_imgDepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Officials picked the flags up off the pool deck and hastily reattached them to the broken metal hoist but were unable to raise them again while the anthem was played for a second time, to the bemusement of Sun and spectators watching in the stands.Diplomatically, Sun played down the incident when quizzed by reporters, saying he was just relieved to finally win the 200 freestyle title which had eluded him in the two previous editions of the Asian Games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’Even though he is the reigning Olympic and world champion, Sun had never won the four-lap race at the Asian games, finishing runner-up to South Korea’s Park Tae-hwan in 2010 and second again to Japan’s Kosuke Hagino four years ago.“I’ve waited eight years for this title,” Sun said. “It also gives me a golden grand slam of Olympic, world and Asian titles. It’s a perfect result, a dream. It’s unbelievable.” ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award MOST READ China’s Sun Yang. APJAKARTA, Indonesia — Sun Yang thought he’d seen it all in his glittering swimming career. That was until Sunday’s opening night of swimming finals at the Asian Games.In an embarrassing technical blunder for games organizers, the flag hoist collapsed during the playing of the Chinese national anthem as Sun stood atop the podium after winning the 200-meter freestyle final.ADVERTISEMENT Officials held the flags up in their hands for the subsequent medal ceremony before locating a replacement hoist for the remaining presentations. By the end of the night, China edged Japan 4-3 in the first seven finals decided.Sun, who is trying to win the 200-, 400-, 800- and 1,500-meter freestyle titles in Jakarta, cruised to victory in one minute 45.43 seconds.He was outside his best but with a busy program the 26-year-old did enough to win comfortably and celebrated in animated fashion, clenching his fists and punching the air in delight.Xu Jiayu, the reigning world champion, celebrated his 23rd birthday by winning his first individual Asian title in the 100-meter backstroke.He reached the wall in 52.34 to equal the games record and deny Japan’s Ryosuke Irie a third straight win in the event.ADVERTISEMENT Wang Jianjiahe led a Chinese 1-2 in the women’s 1,500m freestyle final, edging her fellow 16-year-old in the last desperate lunge to the wall to win in 15:53.68.China won the first golds decided in the pool but Japan hit back by winning the next three, setting the stage for an intense six-day contest to determine Asia’s top swimming nation in the lead up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.Satomi Suzuki secured her first major title when she broke the games record to win the 100 breaststroke in 1:06.40, and Daiya Seto retained his 200 butterfly crown in a time of 1:54.53 after trailing for the first three laps.“I got a bit frantic in the last 25 meters, but I got the job done,” he said. “It gives me a lot more confidence going into next year’s world championships and the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.”Japan finished off the night with yet another games record to win the women’s 4×100 freestyle relay.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal View comments Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Peza offers relief to ecozone firms Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs LATEST STORIES Asian Games: Philippines’ ‘inexperience’ showed in loss to Thailand, says Valdezlast_img read more

Ebola “Fight Requires A Commitment From Every Nation That Has The Capacity To Help”

first_imgDear World,In just over six months, Ebola has managed to bring my country to a standstill. We have lost over 2,000 Liberians. Some are children struck down in the prime of their youth. Some were fathers, mothers, brothers or best friends. Many were brave health workers that risked their lives to save others, or simply offer victims comfort in their final moments. There is no coincidence Ebola has taken hold in three fragile states – Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea – all battling to overcome the effects of interconnected wars. In Liberia, our civil war ended only eleven years ago. It destroyed our public infrastructure, crushed our economy and led to an exodus of educated professionals. A country that had some 3,000 qualified doctors at the start of the war was dependent by its end on barely three dozen. In the last few years, Liberia was bouncing back. We realized there was a long way to go, but the future was looking bright. Now Ebola threatens to erase that hard work. Our economy was set to be larger and stronger this year, offering more jobs to Liberians and raising living standards. Ebola is not just a health crisis – across West Africa, a generation of young people risk being lost to an economic catastrophe as harvests are missed, markets are shut and borders are closed. The virus has been able to spread so rapidly because of the insufficient strength of the emergency, medical and military services that remain under-resourced and without the preparedness to confront such a challenge. This would have been the case whether the confrontation was with Ebola, another infectious disease, or a natural disaster. But one thing is clear. This is a fight in which the whole world has a stake. This disease respects no borders. The damage it is causing in West Africa, whether in public health, the economy or within communities – is already reverberating throughout the region and across the world. The international reaction to this crisis was initially inconsistent and lacking in clear direction or urgency. Now finally, the world has woken up. The community of nations has realized they cannot simply pull up the drawbridge and wish this situation away. This fight requires a commitment from every nation that has the capacity to help – whether that is with emergency funds, medical supplies or clinical expertise. I have every faith in our resilience as Liberians, and our capacity as global citizens, to face down this disease, beat it and rebuild. History has shown that when a people are at their darkest hour, humanity has an enviable ability to act with bravery, compassion and selflessness for the benefit of those most in need. From governments to international organisations, financial institutions to NGOs, politicians to ordinary people on the street in any corner of the world, we all have a stake in the battle against Ebola. It is the duty of all of us, as global citizens, to send a message that we will not leave millions of West Africans to fend for themselves against an enemy that they do not know, and against whom they have little defence. The time for talking or theorizing is over. Only concerted action will save my country, and our neighbours, from experiencing another national tragedy. The words of Henrik Ibsen have never been truer: “A thousand words leave not the same deep impression as does a single deed.”Yours sincerely,Ellen Johnson SirleafShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more