Platini questioned in Swiss probe of $2m FIFA payment

first_img The allegation was revived after a different prosecutor, Thomas Hildbrand, took charge of some cases in the sprawling investigation of alleged corruption in international soccer amid turmoil in the department. Monday is also the last official day in office for Lauber, who was recused last year from FIFA investigations. Lauber resigned in fallout from being disciplined over undocumented meetings with Gianni Infantino, the current FIFA president who became a candidate in 2015 only when his UEFA boss Platini was suspended. Lauber and Infantino now face investigation by a special prosecutor. Both Platini and Blatter deny wrongdoing over the $2 million payment and neither has been charged. Blatter faces other allegations in Switzerland. Platini submitted invoices to FIFA in January 2011 seeking payment for additional salary for advising in Blatter´s first presidential term, from 1998-2002. Former UEFA president Michel Platini appears in front of the building of the Office of the Attorney General of Switzerland, in Bern, Switzerland Monday, 31 Aug. 2020. Read Also: Mane may replace Messi at Barcelona FIFA paid Platini several weeks later during a FIFA presidential campaign won by Blatter after his opponent, Mohamed bin Hammam of Qatar, was implicated in bribing Caribbean voters. Platini´s UEFA had endorsed Blatter late in the campaign. Five different courts and tribunals – including the FIFA ethics committee, the Court of Arbitration for Sport, Switzerland´s supreme court and the European Court of Human Rights – have ruled against Platini since 2015. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Football great Michel Platini arrived at Switzerland´s federal prosecution office Monday morning to be questioned about a $2 million payment he received from FIFA in 2011. Platini is formally a suspect because of the payment that led to his removal as president of European soccer body UEFA — and as a candidate to lead FIFA — when Swiss federal investigators revealed the allegation five years ago. The 65-year-old ex-France captain is suspected of being an accomplice to criminal mismanagement, of misappropriation and an act of forgery, according to documents seen in June by The Associated Press. Platini, a former FIFA vice president, did not comment on the case Monday when he walked into the prosecution headquarters. Sepp Blatter, the 84-year-old former FIFA president who authorized Platini getting the money as deferred salary for work as his adviser a decade earlier, is due to be questioned Tuesday in Bern. A criminal proceeding has been open against Blatter for the Platini payment since September 2015 when federal police questioned both men in an unannounced visit to FIFA offices in Zurich on the day they attended an executive committee meeting. Both men were provisionally suspended from soccer, then banned by FIFA´s ethics committee. Blatter´s 18-year presidency of soccer’s international governing body was ended by the case and his six-year ban runs until October next year. Platini said he hoped to return to soccer when his four-year ban expired last October, months before he was made a criminal suspect. In 2015 he was described as “between a witness and an accused person” by Switzerland´s then-attorney general Michael Lauber. Platini said in 2018 he was cleared of all suspicion in a letter from Swiss prosecutors. Loading… center_img Promoted Content7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Playing Games For Hours Can Do This To Your BodyThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parkslast_img read more

Strong midfield and back-end play carries No. 23 Syracuse over No. 14 St. Joseph’s, 2-1

first_imgChiara Gutsche sensed the pass coming, and began to inch toward midfield. As the clock neared five minutes in overtime, Gutsche crept up from the defensive end and made her move.Moments earlier, fans had called out “Drop Char,” yearning for Charlotte de Vries, SU’s star freshman, to cut off the angle across the field. She didn’t, so the St. Joseph’s defender sent the pass from left to right. Gutsche and de Vries locked eyes, and Gutsche knew she had to step into the passing lane. She intercepted it in stride, and sprinted toward the SJU cage, securing another turnover for SU’s defenders. That sequence ended with Laura Graziosi’s game-winning goal — when she ripped the ball into the back of the cage after a penalty corner insertion — and sealed No. 23 Syracuse’s (4-1) 2-1 overtime win over No. 14 St. Joseph’s (3-1) Friday night. The Orange midfield consistently broke up St. Joseph’s attacks in the middle-third and stifled rushes that neared the crease in the back end. Sometimes, the steal came on the initial pass. Other times, they interrupted the stick-handling that followed. But behind a thorough defensive effort, Syracuse limited tense moments for goalies Syd Taylor and Sarah Sinck, and created enough offensive opportunities to knock off the Hawks.“We just had good pressure from all over the field, everybody was just doing their jobs,” senior Claire Webb, who played for the first time this year, said. “And when everybody does their jobs, we play well as a unit.”It was the complete performance that SU had lacked thus far. During its first four games, offensive dominance and defensive containment had flashed but rarely meshed. Against Vermont and UMass Lowell, SU escaped with wins. Against Lafayette, two early goals allowed by Sarah Sinck overshadowed prominent chances in the Leopards’ end. And against Cornell, those lapses resulted in an upset loss. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHead coach Ange Bradley said Webb’s return brought composure, and the senior replaced freshman Olivia Graham at center back, the defense’s anchor. Bradley also started Taylor for the first time in net, but she never needed to dive to one side or knock away balls with knee pads — the Hawks tallied zero shots in the first half. Junior Sarah Luby, midfielder Claire Cooke and Gutsche spearheaded a middle that swarmed SJU’s passes and chopped balls away, leading to counter-attacks and eliminating lanes for SJU rushes.“We played really together and compact, moved the ball quick and around, always try to open new and more holes,” Carolin Hoffmann said.At times, the turnovers created favorable opportunities in the other end. SJU’s midfielder Cassidy Atchison pushed the ball to the edge of the field and centered a pass into the crease, but Webb sent it in the other direction before another stick could poke it toward the cage. Cooke maintained possession midway through the first quarter, although her long pass intended for Gutsche sailed harmlessly out of bounds and returned control to the Hawks. Had that pass connected, Gutsche would’ve had an odd-man rush at the net.But those plays prevented disaster in the defensive end. With de Vries and her six goals patrolling the offensive zone, a pass on a counter-attack to her stick could end in scoring chances. Leading up to SU’s first goal, Luby poked the ball away to Gutsche and initiated a rush. At the sequence’s end, de Vries backed up St. Joseph’s freshman Kate Blincoe before spinning around and finishing with a reverse hit to give Syracuse a 1-0 lead.“We just kept playing our style of game,” Hoffmann said, “just didn’t even think about what [the Hawks] were doing.”With a one-goal lead, the Orange attempted to slow down the pace early in the second half. When Webb and Graham would corral passes near the crease, they’d simply rotate the ball until an SJU defender pressed hard enough. Then, once the ball progressed into the midfielders’ territory, they too circled it around. First Graham, then to Webb, over to sophomore SJ Quigley, and then back again.Even when St. Joseph’s struck off a penalty corner in the 35th minute, when Emily Peters dropped to the right post and finished in an open net, it wasn’t from a defensive breakdown, Bradley said. Rather, the game-tying tally resulted from the Hawks finding a successful angle off the insert, finding a location where all Taylor could do was watch from the opposite post as the white sphere pounded the back of the cage. “It’s a guessing game,” Bradley said of defending penalty corners. Early in the fourth quarter, still 20 minutes away from when Graziosi took two steps right and rifled the game-winning goal past Hawks goalkeeper Victoria Kammerinke, Graham crouched down at midfield and greeted another St. Joseph’s rush. Fans had started to congregate near the bottom of J.S. Coyne Stadium’s bleachers, awaiting the pivotal rush. Others paced on the top row by the “Game Day” flags whipping in the wind. Graham shuffled to her left and followed until she could poke the ball away. Hoffmann snagged possession and sent an outlet pass to a streaking Luby. Despite an outstretched stick, Luby watched the pass jump past her stick. She shook her head.But Graham wasn’t disheveled at the missed opportunity. The freshman had done her job, similar to her other midfield and back partners the rest of the night. Graham jogged to her right, back toward her normal spot, and grasped her stick with both hands. At one point, another rush would come. Another chance to start a counter-attack. She just had to be ready. Comments Published on September 13, 2019 at 10:48 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more